r Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Lifecycle 1. Winter
Life Cycle - Winter-spring


Winter

The fewest people and the highest avian population of the year visit Flushing Meadows Corona Park in the winter season, Some birds are born in the park, the greatest number are day visitors and some never leave, becoming yearlong natives of Queens. The park's lawns are well maintained, and remain green most of the year. Flushing Meadows, for a grass eating species, is paradise on earth, plus, from a birds eye view, the park has location, location, location. The Long Island Sound and Flushing Bay, the Atlantic Ocean and Jamaica Bay (Gateway National Park) are but a hop, skip and a jump away for a bird (and for bird watchers.)



Meadow Lake Ice Flow Meadow Lake Ice Flow

Meadow Lake ice flow. A rapid current usually keeps part of the lake from freezing. The birds seem to have an affinity for the ice, and move to land mainly to feed on lawn grass. Meadow Lake does not support a native fish population.

Meadow Lake Ice Flow


Lawn Feeding Egret Fishing in Vain

One Of Several Large Flocks Feeding On Flooded Lawns Late In December

New York City is situated in the main migratory flight path of most bird species. Meadow Lake teems with birds in mid-winter. Most stay in the park only during daylight. At sundown, they wing north to Flushing Bay, or south to join the huge flocks at Jamaica Bay. Flushing Meadows offers the birds a hardy vegetarian lunch of lawn grass, but Jamaica Bay has fish aplenty.

Foraging for Food
Foraging for Food


Flooded Walkway and Soil Snowmen Replace Picnickers

Flushing Meadows is a nice way to say "Flushing swamp." The soil is often saturated and a foot will sink to the ankle when walking on the lawn. The dry summer months are when the park is most hospitable for recreational use. The paved roadways support foot and automobile traffic throughout the year, but any vehicle that ventures off the pavement can quickly sink to the axle.

Winter Wonderland
Winter Wonderland


Swan Spots Us Moseys Over

Swan spots us at a distance and moseys over for a look. The big water foul like swans and geese are accomplished beggars, quite adept at finessing a meal. In fact, the lake front adjoining the east and west parking lots usually has the highest concentration of birds in the park. These gregarious creatures patiently, and hungrily await the park's many visitors. These birds have discovered the rewards of "Show Business."

Looks Us Over
Swan Ignores Camera Flashes Swan Ready to be Hand Fed

Swan ignores camera flashes, and moves in close, ready to be hand fed.

A Winters Nest


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